Michael Holdrege

Michael Holdrege
  • Michael Holdrege

  • .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
  • 773.465.2662 x8313
  • Biography

10th Grade: German II - Course Description

In the first semester of German II, students review verbs, learn more tenses, and address proper sequence and sentence structure. In the second semester, students recall past events and describe them in proper sequence, practice case prepositions and subordinate clauses, and learn colloquial phrases. By the end of Level II, students should have mastered the imperative tense and present, past, and future verb tenses. Students should also know the difference between superlatives, comparisons, subordinate clauses, conjunctions, the accusative case, and dative case. They should be able to write and tell stories in present and past tense.

10th Grade: German III - Course Description

By the end of German III, students should have mastered the present and past verbs, including reflexives. They should be able to differentiate between the nominative, accusative and dative cases in terms of prepositions, articles, and pronouns, as well as know and apply with accuracy, dative verbs and relative clauses. Practically speaking, students should also know how to ask for products in a pharmacy, describe their injuries or illnesses, tell/recount a story in the present and past, look for a hostel while traveling, and read a short novel.

11th Grade: German III - Course Description

By the end of German III, students should have mastered the present and past verbs, including reflexives. They should be able to differentiate between the nominative, accusative and dative cases in terms of prepositions, articles, and pronouns, as well as know and apply with accuracy, dative verbs and relative clauses. Practically speaking, students should also know how to ask for products in a pharmacy, describe their injuries or illnesses, tell/recount a story in the present and past, look for a hostel while traveling, and read a short novel.

12th Grade Marine Biology - Course Description

This class begins with a brief overview of marine invertebrates in preparation for a week on Hermit Island in Maine, where the students meet the flora and fauna of the North Atlantic coast. They navigate seaweed covered rocks in the process of exploring life-filled tide-pools; they wade through thick mud in search of soft-shelled clams; they paint land and seascapes; they learn about dune ecology and the genesis of beach forms; and they investigate the tiny details of several ocean dwellers with the help of microscopes. Back at school, the class discusses and compares fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and several characteristic groups of the mammals. The class ends with a consideration of the unique nature of the human being.

9th Grade: German II - Course Description

In the first semester of German II, students review verbs, learn more tenses, and address proper sequence and sentence structure. In the second semester, students recall past events and describe them in proper sequence, practice case prepositions and subordinate clauses, and learn colloquial phrases. By the end of Level II, students should have mastered the imperative tense and present, past, and future verb tenses. Students should also know the difference between superlatives, comparisons, subordinate clauses, conjunctions, the accusative case, and dative case. They should be able to write and tell stories in present and past tense.

Business and Math Accounting - Course Description

This course begins with methods of data organization.  We learn how elementary statistical tools can provide organizations with a basis for decision-making.  In particular, we considered how surveys can provide a representative sample of a population that needs assessment.  We then learn how the data gathered can be grouped into frequency classes, how a frequency table is constructed and how these findings represented graphically in a survey response histogram.  Our focus then shifts to how an organization can develop a clear picture of the flow of activity (and money) between itself and other entities by means of accounting procedures.  In particular, we learn how business transactions can be recorded and analyzed with the help of double entry bookkeeping and the use of financial statements.

Developmental Biology and Genetics - Course Description

This class considers the concept of an organism from several perspectives. Beginning with experimental embryology and Spemann’s Nobel Prize winning experiments, the class considers cell-division and cell-differentiation as these appear “in vitro” within a healthy organism and in cancer cells. Thereafter, students focus on the development of genetics from Mendel to the recognition of the central role that DNA and RNA play in protein synthesis, as well as recent discoveries in the realm of epigenetics.

Economics - Course Description

After considering the worldwide network of organizations and activities involved in producing a simple product like a bar of Swiss chocolate, students move to a study of pre-capitalist economics, then on to Adam Smith and his idea of a self-regulating free-market system. Students learn how supply and demand curves lead to an equilibrium point where overproduction and shortfall can be avoided, and about factors that affect supply and demand. The class considers how to resolve the tensions that exist between our objectives as self-seeking consumers and the ideals we carry as members of a humane democratic society. The class concludes with consideration of subprime mortgages, mortgage-backed securities, and other factors that contributed to the economic recession that began in 2008.

Geology - Course Description

This class begins with the consideration of several seminal insights that marked the birth of geology as a science. The freshmen learn of the geological phenomena that led Wegener to his idea of continental drift. They consider a series of discoveries (paleomagnetism, seafloor spreading, etc.) that contributed to the modern view of plate tectonics. Concepts such as mantle convection, converging and diverging plate boundaries, and hot spots illuminate many geological riddles that characterize our earth. The class concludes with a consideration of glaciers and the part they played in shaping the current topography of Illinois.


 

Geophysiology - Course Description

The focus of this class is on the geophysiology of the earth. The sophomores look at many of the complex phenomena that make up the biosphere of our planetrom, including Hadley Cells, the Coriolis Effect and ocean currents, the pressure gradient force, jet streams, and global climate change.

Human Biology I Course Description

This class begins with a focus on the human sensory organization. After an extensive consideration of the eye and vision, students explore the sense of balance and the kinesthetic sense. The second part of the class involves observations and reflections on the human skeleton, which include comparative studies of human and animal skulls, and how the human foot develops over time in the process of learning to stand and walk.

Human Biology II - Course Description

Topics in this class cover the anatomy and physiology of the heart, the circulatory system, the components of human blood, the significance of blood groups, the non-specific and specific immune systems, the nature of HIV infection and AIDS, the lungs, and lastly, the human brain.