The Bulletin

Why Give: What is the Value of the Annual Fund?

Tuesday, November 2012

 Brendan Finucane is a music teacher at Chicago Waldorf School where he teaches orchestra and strings instruments to students in grades 3-12. As a graduate of the Washington Waldorf School (class of 2000), Brendan has an intimate knowledge of what makes Waldorf education special. Brendan has been involved with Waldorf schools since he was four years old, and now teaches here at Chicago Waldorf School. He has the unique, deep-rooted experience of having grown from a Waldorf student into an accomplished Waldorf teacher.

“I credit my Waldorf education with giving me the capacity to express and pursue several passions, and to maintain a balance between them. In addition to my role as a teacher, I am also a small business owner of a recording studio co-op. As a musician I am equally at home in a classical ensemble, playing electric cello in my loud and face-melting band, and sequencing digital electronic music in my production studio. I’ve even been able to find a balance between these music-related activities and my interest in worldly philosophy––via participation in an on-going reading group studying the 200 year history of the political and academic left.” 

“When I look at my own experiences with Waldorf education I see an education worth investing in. I see an education that addresses the development of the whole being…”

“I see my own Waldorf education as foundational to who I am today; this determines why I believe the Chicago Waldorf School deserves my support. When I look at my own experiences with Waldorf education I see an education worth investing in. I see an education that addresses the development of the whole being through a diversity of the arts. It is an education that nurtures students with the ability to intentionally and purposefully use technology, and study its modern and ancient contexts–from music and agriculture to architecture and communications. The arts are the sum of collective human knowledge–they are the ways in which we sustain and reproduce our world. I believe in the rich and balanced introduction of the arts that Waldorf students experience, but this requires strong resources, including supporting the teachers and providing the physical equipment that enrich Waldorf arts programs within the educational curriculum.”

"If this education is about anything, it is about what we bring to the world around us"

“As we bring the Waldorf experience of the arts to our students and to our larger community, we must be backed by a community that is involved and supportive. The Annual Fund is a key element in providing that crucial support and embracing the potential of our community. It is a deep an ongoing commitment to our students and faculty–and to our mission.”