The Bulletin

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. - Agent of Change

Monday, January 2012

Mention Martin Luther King, Jr.’s name to anyone walking down the street and you’ll often hear a similar theme—he was a powerful force that fought for equality and justice. Ask a 5th grader from my mother’s class (she's a teacher) in a low socioeconomic neighborhood just outside of Detroit and you'll hear themes of inspiration, hope, and role model. An 11-year old boy told my mother that King gives him hope that the world will continue to change for the better; his work inspires him to be respectful and act with dignity toward all human beings. Powerful words from an 11-year old boy who doesn't know if he'll be in the same home each week. He clings to the lessons learned from King's struggle and attempts to remain a positive change agent within his own family and community.

“The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically... Intelligence plus character—that is the goal of true education.”

FESTIVAL: JOIN CWS' MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. ASSEMBLY

Friday, January 13th, 2pm in the school auditorium

Born in January 15, 1929, Martin Luther King, Jr. was an American clergymen and leader of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. Using nonviolent methods such as peaceful marches and sit-ins to seek equality and justice for all human beings, he challenged American society, desiring to put an end to racial segregation and discrimination. He also worked to end poverty and war through education. King continues to be a powerful force 44 years after his assassination. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a federal holiday established in 1986, is more than a day off from school or work. It is meant to commemorate the sacrifice that King and his family made to secure freedom, justice and a higher quality of life for all mankind. To celebrate King's life and work for human rights, Chicago Waldorf School is celebrating King with a special assembly organized by the Inclusion and Diversity Committee (IDC) on Friday, January 13th in the school auditorium. Special reflections and musical offerings will be performed by students and faculty. This year's theme comes from a letter written by Dr. King while he was imprisoned in a Birmingham jail. In it he wrote:

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.

- Martin Luther King Jr.

The entire school community is invited to attend and share in this school-wide event. This assembly is appropriate for children over 6 years in age. Submitted by: Lori Browder, Marketing Volunteer Photo from rolexblog.blogspot.com