The Bulletin

Supporting Faculty Professional Development

Wednesday, March 2011

Faculty are a core strength of the Waldorf Education

The Chicago Waldorf School has long been recognized as one of the schools providing leadership in Waldorf education for North America.  This reputation is directly linked to our commitment to providing professional development opportunities for our teachers so that they can continue to educate our students working from an enlivened, comprehensive and contemporary relationship to the Waldorf curriculum.  Professional development includes continuing training and attendance at conferences, active mentoring programs and evaluations of our faculty from master teachers visiting from outside our school community.

The Chicago Waldorf School faculty holds itself to a high standard of excellence in teaching that reflects the challenge of this developmental approach to education. We seek to meet the educational needs of the developing child from early childhood through high school. This requires a well-trained, well mentored faculty fully engaged in ongoing self-reflection and assessment. In this rapidly changing world it is essential that our teachers have the opportunity to refresh and renew their teaching perspectives and to participate in contemporary research.

Waldorf education is a transformative process for students and teachers alike. Let us commit ourselves to providing the best possible education and future for our students at the Chicago Waldorf School through a fully funded and comprehensive professional development program for our outstanding faculty.  The 2011 Chicago Waldorf School Gala, The Year of the Teacher: Passion & Purpose, is a celebration that brings together trustees, parents, faculty, staff, and other friends of the school to support this commitment. This year’s celebration will begin with a cocktail reception, Passion & Purpose program, and will be followed by a Dutch Auction. Gifts made to the auction will be directed to a special fund that will enable CWS faculty to enhance their work with our students through professional development opportunities.

Chicago Waldorf School’s ANNUAL GALA

Saturday, March 26th at 6:30pm

Invitations have been mailed to community members; Please RSVP with the reply envelopes. Other interested individuals or companies who would like to attend are welcome to contact our Development Director, Jackie Johnson for complete details.

We look forward to this year’s Gala being a lively social event; and a fun opportunity to support our teachers’—and the school’s—professional reputation and authority.
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Congratulations to CWS athlete, Matthew Kane!

Wednesday, March 2011

Chicago Waldorf School student-athlete rower,
Matthew Kane, named WSC Scholar

World Sport Chicago, legacy organization of Chicago’s olympic and paralympic bid, names Matthew Kane as one of 56 Chicago student-athletes awarded the WSC Scholarship.

CHICAGO – February 10, 2011 – World Sport Chicago, a non-profit organization devoted to promoting sport to the youth of Chicago, is pleased to name rower Matthew Kane to the World Sport Chicago Scholarship Program.  The 56 members of the Class of 2011 WSC Scholars are Chicago high school juniors who represent 20 different Olympic and Paralympic sports including Sailing, Badminton, Goalball, Soccer, etc. and include able-bodied athletes as well as athletes with physical or visual disabilities. WSC Scholars attend 31 different public, private and parochial schools and represent over 30 Chicago neighborhoods.  Students were selected based on their commitment to academics, athletics and the Olympic values. WSC Scholars will have access to World Sport Chicago events, receive Kaplan ACT test preparation courses and participate in Chicago Scholars’ pre-college mentoring program.  Students will also have the opportunity to compete for one of 16 renewable college scholarships worth up to $10,000 annually ($40,000 total), supported by the MacArthur Foundation. The 2011 WSC Scholars will also join last year’s inaugural WSC Scholars as athlete ambassadors and will speak with schools and community groups about the importance of higher education, athletics participation and the Olympic Movement.

“We are excited to welcome a new group of student-athletes to the WSC Scholarship Program,” says Scott Myers, Executive Director of World Sport Chicago.  “Last year’s program was a rewarding experience for the students, mentors and partner organizations and we look forward to providing the same opportunities for the 2011 WSC Scholars as they pursue their collegiate and athletic goals.”
World Sport Chicago believes that sport has the power to transform and is dedicated to helping children in Chicago find a sport to meet their interests and abilities.  The organization promotes the Olympic ideals of fitness, education and well being by working with partner organizations to launch or expand sport programs for kids. WSC is working to introduce Chicago’s youth to the fun and benefit of sports and the ideals of fair play, teamwork, respect and leadership.  Learn more at www.wscscholars.org

Waldorf Thunder Athletics

Wednesday, March 2011

From Coach Robb Gill—

High School Boys’ Basketball Game Win!!

The high school boys won their first basketball game against the Bulldogs of The British School on February 17.  It was a good way to go into Mid-Winter break.  The team will be preparing for conference tournament play the first week in March.

IHSA Swimming Sectionals

Keven Henley and Armel Cazedepats took part in the Illinois High School Association swimming sectional meet last week at Evanston High School. They performed well at the meet, as they were able to place in the top 6 in their events. Swimming is a tough—and sometimes agonizing—endurance sport, and we respect the effort these two young men put into training and competition this season.

Join the 2011 Circus Club!

Wednesday, March 2011

CIRCUS CLUB 2011 begins next week.

Now you can join the circus without running away from home! Join the Waldorf Circus Club with your friends, right here in our own gymnasium…

Registration is still open to Chicago Waldorf School families. Circus Club is open to grades 3-12. All classes (except Advanced) are from 3:00-5:00PM and the entire program runs from March – May.

Mondays 3:00-5:00pm (Begins March 7)
Classes will be taught by Actor’s Gymnasium staff. Students in grades 3-12 students will stretch, tumble and be introduced to the Spanish Web, trapeze, silks and more.

Tuesdays 3:00-5:00pm (Begins March 8 )
Groundwork skills such as tumbling, juggling, unicycle, spinning plates, acrobatics/balancing and clowning. Taught by Meshu Tamrat and Andrea Shaffer; new this year: Advanced Jump Rope Tricks taught by Ashley Gambill.

Tuesdays – Advanced Session 5:00-6:30pm (Begins March 8 )
Danger Hour - for students interested in tumbling, sports acrobatics and break dance
Advanced Aerial – for students with previous experience and the desire to work one-on-one with an
aerialist to develop a routine. Students in the advanced class can work on both ground and aerial elements and will perform either at the Big Show or during the MAY FAIR, or both.

Fridays 3:00-5:00pm (Begins March 11)
Classes will be taught by Actor’s Gymnasium staff. Students in grades 3-12 students will stretch, tumble and be introduced to the Spanish Web, trapeze, silks and more.

The BIG Show: A Public Performance (Friday, May 27th at 6:00pm)
All students will perform in a show on Friday, May 27th. On that day, students will stay
after school for a dress rehearsal and will be fed dinner, and then will perform in the show.

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What will you need?
Students should come to each class prepared. They should have a snack in their lunch (students will not be permitted to go to New Leaf after school) and should have appropriate clothing. Clothing should be stretchy, and not baggy. T-shirts, leotards, sweatpants, shorts and leggings are all appropriate. Students will be in socks or barefoot most of the time.

Enroll in Circus Club Now!

Space is limited and enrollment will be on a first come/first served basis. Those with questions
should contact Ms. Shaffer at ashaffer@chicagowaldorf.org or at 773.465.2662 x8323. Thanks!

Sally Fallon Morell headlines Family Farmed Expo

Wednesday, March 2011

Join Sally Fallon Morell for a full day at the FamilyFarmed EXPO on Saturday, March 19.

Including her three hour workshop: NOURISHING TRADITIONAL DIETS: The Key to Vibrant Health

Sally will discuss how animal fats, properly prepared whole grains, enzyme-enriched foods and nourishing bone broths kept our ancestors healthy. Her presentation begins with an explanation of Dr. Weston Prices unforgettable photographs of healthy traditional peoples.

Sally will also explain the underlying factors in a variety of traditional diets that conferred beauty, strength and complete freedom from disease on so-called primitive populations. Other workshops that day include food preservation, making cheese, year round gardening, shopping local and organic on a budget, whole animal consumption, and raising chickens in your backyard.

The EXPO also includes cooking demos from some of Chicago’s top chefs, plus over 100 exhibits.

Tickets for the full day are $35 including Sally’s workshop. For more information, go to the Family Farmed Expo webpage

The FamilyFarmed EXPO is the Midwest’s leading Good Food event. Thursday and Friday include a financing conference and trade show focusing on growing the good food movement, farms and businesses. Click here for more information about the entire three day event.

A Raw Milk Warrior

Wednesday, March 2011

Michael Schmidt—farmer and raw milk advocate— fights for the right “to eat what we want.”

Michael Schmidt’s grandfather was part of the Agriculture course with Rudolf Steiner in 1924 and his family fled their ancestral biodynamic farm in Germany in the middle of the night from occupying Russian troops at the end of World War II. Michael has fought tirelessly for the rights of farmers and consumers in Ontario for the better part of a generation.

In November 2006, Michael Schmidt’s farm in Durham, two hours north of Toronto, was raided by over 20 armed officers.

They weren’t looking for drugs or guns.  They were looking for milk. Michael’s crime: Selling and distributing raw milk.

Schmidt, a graduate of the Waldorf school in Stuttgart, has seen his share of trouble with the government over his fight for consumer freedom. He saw his farm threatened and his livelihood disintegrate as a result of the first “Milk War” in the 1990s.  He had to sell 500 of the 600 acres of his family farm to pay his legal bills. The toll on his family was immense, but he built his business back up by partnering his customers with his cows (he actually “sold” each teat for $300) in a cow-sharing program. His customers owned the cows and he took care of them. However, it was still illegal in Canada to sell or distribute raw milk to consumers.

Michael Schmidt’s opposition to the raw milk ban put him on a collision course with the Ontario government, and has set off a public debate that touched upon a whole host of issues: the immense power of Canada’s $12-billion dairy industry and the challenges facing small, independent farmers; the increasingly controversial nature of large-scale factory farming methods; and a growing public unease about the way most of our food products are processed before they reach us.

After the raid in 2006, government pressure continued and after $80,000 in legal bills, Schmidt decided to represent himself in court in the second “Milk War.” In his own words, his goal had always been to be “a happy farmer.” The most recent court judgment acquitted him of any crimes and allows him to continue his farm’s raw milk sales in Ontario.

Despite a government appeal to try to overturn the judgment, Michael and his supporters remain confident that their freedom to drink raw milk will not only be supported in Ontario, but will spread to the rest of Canada. A group of highly respected constitutional lawyers has taken up Michael’s case in the appeal, leaving him free from fighting the legal battle against the appeal himself.

Michael, whose son Markus is helping with the cows on their farm in Durham, is busy traveling across Canada and the US to support the many initiatives and farmers who are trying to enshrine their right to drink raw milk in a vast array of proposals that are coming before legislative bodies this year. Many of these farmers remain under constant threat from the government and the dairy industry. Schmidt insists that this fight is about more than just milk; it is about the fundamental right “to eat what we want.”

In September 2010, a film about Michael Schmidt’s courageous battle premiered in Toronto. Milk War was co-produced for the ichannel by Stornoway Productions and The Path to Gimli and features an award-winning production staff.

The Bovine (Michael Schmidt’s raw milk blogsite) is a great place to start for more information about his campaign to guarantee the right to drink raw milk.
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This article is shared from WaldorfTeachers.com Michael Schmidt talked with them during a regional biodynmamic conference in January. He told them about his raw milk campaign and shared the recently released documentary about his work entitled “Milk War.”

Race To Nowhere, film screening

Wednesday, March 2011

If you missed the chance to see Race To Nowhere when we premiered it at Chicago Waldorf School last Fall, you have another chance to see this wonderful film that is being screened at Loyola University this Thursday March 3 at 7:00PM

Race To Nowhere is a new film—produced by concerned parents—that examines the culture of hollow achievement and pressure to perform that has invaded America’s schools. This film examines the price our kids pay for this “race to nowhere,” where cheating is commonplace, and stress-related illness, depression and burnout are rampant.

Featuring the stories of young people who have been pushed to the brink and educators who are burned out and worried that students aren’t developing the skills needed for the global economy, Race to Nowhere points to the silent epidemic running rampant in our schools. Race To Nowhere is a call to families, educators, experts and policy makers to examine current assumptions of how to best prepare the youth of America to become healthy, bright contributors and leading citizens in the 21st century.

Join us as we view this documentary and discuss important educational concerns shared by parents, college students, teachers, principals, counselors, and future educators.

Loyola University, Sullivan Center: Galvin Auditorium
6339 North Sheridan Road / Chicago, Illinois

Tickets to the event will be sold online for $10: Click here for tickets.

Douglas Gerwin on Cultivating Imagination

Monday, February 2011

Root, Shoot, and Fruit: Cultivating Imagination in Childhood & Adolescence

Wednesday, March 2 at 7:30 pm

A Presentation for Parents and Friends
by Douglas Gerwin, Director of the Center for Anthroposophy, Wilton, NH

Children typically go through three major phases along the path of their development, starting with birth and early childhood, passing through the elementary years, and culminating with puberty and adolescence. During each of these developmental phases they learn in radically different ways, partly for reasons of their changing physiology––including the maturation of the brain––and partly because of their burgeoning inner life.

A Waldorf program responds to these inner and outer changes by helping children unfold their nascent capacities. Chief of these is the imagination as a faculty of cognition.  Imagination can be trained to perceive truth and reality just as effectively as rational intellectuality. Out of childhood imagination, cultivated in the lower school, arise in the high school teenager those crucial abilities to weigh, to assess, and to arrive at truth.

Through examples drawn from the artistic as well as the academic curriculum, we will explore in a practical way what it means to learn “from the inside of things” rather than to be instructed about them from the outside.

 

Douglas Gerwin, Director of the Center for Anthroposophy, has taught history, literature, German, music, and life science at the Waldorf high school level since 1983. He presently divides his time between adult education and teaching in various North American Waldorf schools. Douglas is the founder of the Waldorf High School Teacher Education Program at the Center for Anthroposophy and editor of several books related to Waldorf education.

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