The Bulletin

The Negative Effect of Increasingly Plugged-In Kids

Wednesday, July 2015

A continuing stream of clinical studies and experts are finding detrimental effects on kids who are exposed to ever increasing amounts of screen time. Below is an excerpt from an article published in the New York Times on July 6, 2015 that can be found in the "Personal Health" Section.


Screen Addiction Is Taking a Toll on Children

Excessive use of computer games among young people in China appears to be taking an alarming turn and may have particular relevance for American parents whose children spend many hours a day focused on electronic screens. The documentary “Web Junkie,” to be shown next Monday on PBS, highlights the tragic effects on teenagers who become hooked on video games, playing for dozens of hours at a time often without breaks to eat, sleep or even use the bathroom. Many come to view the real world as fake.

Chinese doctors consider this phenomenon a clinical disorder and have established rehabilitation centers where afflicted youngsters are confined for months of sometimes draconian therapy, completely isolated from all media, the effectiveness of which remains to be demonstrated.

While Internet addiction is not yet considered a clinical diagnosis here, there’s no question that American youths are plugged in and tuned out of “live” action for many more hours of the day than experts consider healthy for normal development. And it starts early, often with preverbal toddlers handed their parents’ cellphones and tablets to entertain themselves when they should be observing the world around them and interacting with their caregivers.

In its 2013 policy statement on “Children, Adolescents, and the Media,” the American Academy of Pediatrics cited these shocking statistics from a Kaiser Family Foundation study in 2010: “The average 8- to 10-year-old spends nearly eight hours a day with a variety of different media, and older children and teenagers spend more than 11 hours per day.” Television, long a popular “babysitter,” remains the dominant medium, but computers, tablets and cellphones are gradually taking over.

“Many parents seem to have few rules about use of media by their children and adolescents,”

the academy stated, and two-thirds of those questioned in the Kaiser study said their parents had no rules about how much time the youngsters spent with media.

Parents, grateful for ways to calm disruptive children and keep them from interrupting their own screen activities, seem to be unaware of the potential harm from so much time spent in the virtual world.

“We’re throwing screens at children all day long, giving them distractions rather than teaching them how to self-soothe, to calm themselves down,” said Catherine Steiner-Adair, a Harvard-affiliated clinical psychologist and author...(continue reading the article at its source)

by Jane E. Brody, for the New York Times - July 6-2015


Stay Connected with CWS Summer Events

Monday, June 2015

Meeting other families at Albion Beach on Tuesdays is a great summer way to play! All are welcome!

Join the Fun; CWS remains active all summer long! 

Keep active with Waldorf families at one, or all, of CWS’s summer events. Enroll in a CWS Summer Camp, march with us in Chicago’s Pride Parade, stop by the CWS booth at one of the many summer festivals listed below, or join families on Albion Beach Tuesdays. There are opportunities every week to stay connected with Waldorf families and friends in Chicago!

          •  46th Annual Chicago Pride Parade

                  Sunday, June 28th   /  11:30am -1:00 pm   /   Bus leaves CWS at 10:30 am


         •  Andersonville Midsommarfest  

                  Saturday – Sunday, June 13th  & 14th   /   11:00 am – 5:00 pm


         •  Square Roots Festival

                  Saturday – Sunday, July 11th  & 12th   /  12:00 pm – 7:00 pm


         •  Glenwood Avenue Arts Festival

                   Saturday –Sunday, August 15th  & 16th  /  12:00 pm – 5:00 pm


Tuesdays are CWS Summer Beach Days

at Albion Beach / All Summer long
Starts Tuesday June 16th   /   10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Get together with new, current, and alumni CWS families at Albion Beach any Tuesday this summer (weather permitting). Look for the big red CWS sun umbrella. 


CWS Summer Camps

weekly camps from June 15th  – August 7th
8:30 am – 3:30 pm (or EC half days til 11:45 am)

Kids Camp, EC Camp, Songwriting, Parkour, Basketball & Volleyball Camps. Choose your favorite or enroll all summer!
Enroll now in one of our many camp options at:  

Apply today. The Main Office is accepting applications now!


Class of 2015- The Seniors’ Next Steps

Monday, June 2015

We present to you the graduating class of 2015!

Congratulations to our seniors who have come to the culmination of the Waldorf High School's arc. After this Winter's focus on Senior Presentations and Spring's absorbing college selections process, they have now turned to the joys of preparing Summer plans and prepping for Fall experiences in colleges, professional training and work experiences, and travel opportunities too. We wish them the best and look forward to hearing about all their accomplishments in the future!

Their next moves take the 2015 seniors far afield into varied pursuits and passions...

Here are profiles of their plans for 2015-16:

Anyah Akanni will attend Northwestern University as an Evans Scholar, a pre-med student, and biochemistry major. She is especially intrigued by nuVIBE (Northwestern University’s Ventures in Biology Education) which helps students, as early as the freshman year, to formulate research ideas, write proposals, and obtain funding for original student-initiated research.  Anyah commented that there doesn’t seem to be just one type of student at Northwestern, and she appreciates the liberal arts focus in a university setting. Two clubs, Model UN and Mock Trial, also appeal to Anyah. Anyah looks forward to living on campus, but also staying close enough to visit her family.

Alex Bender-Hooper will work at Chicago ‘Tiquer, a local resale business. This will allow him to gain business experience while also allowing him to pursue old and new passions (including train collecting, cat adoption and ownership, and car restoration). In the future, Alex will consider further schooling in the areas of veterinary care or engineering.  

Michael Chungbin is enthusiastic about attending the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York, where he will study in their unique program in Photographic Imaging Technology. This program focuses on the engineering side of film and photography, and emphasizes the development of new products and technologies, specifically for bio-medical uses and consumer products. Michael is also considering a minor in engineering, physics or optics, and he may try out for one of the ice hockey or volleyball teams. First, however, is a summer trip to Hawaii, where he plans to make a film documentary.

Juan Correa has accepted an offer of admission to Knox College in Illinois, but will defer in order to take a gap year, as he plans to work full-time in Florida prior to attending college  At Knox, Juan found that both the students and professors seemed “very real”, and diverse in many different ways. He also found the buildings on campus to be beautiful. Juan will begin at Knox in the fall of 2016, and plans to study psychology and become involved with the theater productions.  

Madeleine Driscoll is excited to attend Columbia College Chicago, where she will major in fine arts with a likely focus on painting. Madeleine appreciates the openness of the Columbia curriculum; it is not as regimented as some other art schools, and she looks forward to developing her own style right from the beginning.  She may minor in business or advertising. This summer Madeleine will seek an apartment in the city, and will resume her internship work with Lee Tracy, a local artist. This work will continue throughout the school year, and Madeleine will gain valuable skills in stretching canvasses, among other art-related tasks.

Lauren Dubendorf will attend Eckerd College in Florida where she is considering a major in marine biology, a particularly renowned program there. She notes that the students are enthusiastic, service-oriented, and interested in study abroad (85% of students study abroad in winter term). In addition to typical clubs, there are a number of events and traditions throughout the year, in which all participate and which help the student body to bond as a whole. A minor in art will round out Lauren’s education.

Jimmy Geraghty will enroll at Lawrence University in Wisconsin. He intends to major in Government Studies (political science) and will likely attend law school after Lawrence (which has a very good acceptance rate into graduate and professional schools). Jimmy commented that it is a picturesque campus with a thriving music scene. In addition to performances by music students, Lawrence brings in outside bands to do concerts. Jimmy may try out for the basketball team, too. As he termed it, a "quirky student body" will further add to Jimmy’s college experience.

Joe Hartz will work and attend community college in Chicago next year. He looks ahead to attending a university, where he plans to study music business and songwriting. Belmont University in Nashville is of particular interest as he would be able to combine these majors and begin a professional music career while still in college. For now, Joe wants to have the flexibility offered by community college so that he can finish editing his first novel, Synchronize, and begin writing his second novel, Distortion.  

The seniors in costume from their scene work in the drama program.


Isaiah Hasselquist will attend the University of Illinois at Chicago while living at home. He likes the urban location and immediately felt at home surrounded by the city that he loves. Although some of his freshman classes will be large lectures, Isaiah notes that the lectures break up into smaller groups that meet regularly. Isaiah will major in biology, and has a special interest in wildlife biology, especially reptiles. Isaiah also hopes to take advantage of a study abroad opportunity in order to broaden his knowledge of reptiles in their native habitat.

Alex Leonard has decided on DePaul University as her home for the next four years. Alex is very interested in social justice issues; and she found the DePaul campus to be very diverse and representative of the city, as well as welcoming of women’s advocacy and LGBT groups. She especially likes that the campus itself is integrated into a city neighborhood. Even though Alex is a native Chicagoan, she looks forward to her Explore Chicago freshman class, which will be an opportunity to get acquainted with the city via a different intellectual perspective. Alex is undecided about her major, but plans to take courses in psychology and women’s studies.

Gregory Levinson is looking forward to attending Columbia College Chicago, where he has already taken the initiative to meet multiple faculty members in the Media Arts Department. His specific interests include sound design for movies and games, sound effects, and music composition. Gregory will continue to study music performance as well, and will consider auditioning for one of the Columbia jazz ensembles. He has already secured a twice-weekly gig at a local restaurant; see him at Little Bucharest on Elston & Addison! Finally, Gregory will continue to study martial arts as a lifelong pursuit.

Aja Linnet will return to Denmark after three years in the U.S., and commented that the change is both exciting and depressing. Aja will live in the small city of Espergaerde, her hometown, in a private apartment at her mom’s house. Because Aja did not attend secondary school in Denmark and take the typical Danish language classes, Aja will need to take a four-month Danish language course, in which three years of Danish are condensed into a semester of study. Upon completion, Aja can then enter university study, where she may consider a major in business.

Bianca Moreno has found her next educational home at Beloit College in Wisconsin. She wanted a small, friendly school, with many study abroad opportunities, and a welcoming environment where she could get to know her professors well. Bianca plans to study both creative writing and education. Ultimately, Bianca would like to be a special education teacher, and will likely pursue a master’s degree in that area. This summer, Bianca will resume her internship work with Lee Tracy, a local artist, as a paid employee.

Auset Muhammad will study chemistry and compete in Division I fencing at Temple University in Philadelphia. Auset has practiced with the team and immediately felt at home as it is a friendly environment with a good balance between academics and sports. It made an impression on Auset that the coach, a two-time Olympian and two-time USFA national champion, maintains a philosophy of taking athletes to their full potential in all areas of life, not just athletics. Go Auset and go Owls!

Maria Park looks forward to life in Brooklyn, NY at the Pratt Institute. She notes that Pratt has a beautifully landscaped, green, and traditional residential campus; it is a unexpected urban oasis. Pratt enjoys a top reputation in the arts, and is noted for highly ranked professors, as well as high incomes following graduation. Maria plans to study jewelry design or interior design. This summer, Maria will travel with her parents to New York, Alaska, Seattle, and then back to Korea until it is time to return to the U.S.

Jenna Rogers will attend the University of British Columbia (UBC), following a gap year in Germany in which she will live and volunteer at the Camphill Community in Hermannsberg in the southern part of the country. Jenna will depart this July, travel a bit in Germany, stay at Camphill from August through February, and will then travel to Italy in the spring with her grandmother. In the fall of 2016, Jenna will begin studies at UBC, but is undecided about her major. UBC’s highly regarded overall reputation, as well as its location right on the ocean, were key selling points for Jenna.

Sam Sendelbach has secured a full-time position at Material Development, Inc., a material science and R&D engineering company based in Evanston. Industry experience will help Sam to determine whether this type of research will be his life’s work, and what type of degree to pursue. He will also continue his own research on the sequencing of DNA as a Northwestern University Research Affiliate, a designation which gives him access to the labs. Sam also looks forward to pursuing visual art, music, poetry, and photography as a balance to his research work.

Elijah Teague has a strong interest in fashion merchandising; a passion he shared in his Senior Project. Indeed, he has already placed and sold some of his clothing designs in a local shop with great success. Elijah selected the Business in Fashion program at Richmond; The American International University in London to continue this path. He is very excited to purse his educational experience in Europe, and will investigate the intersection of fashion, culture and commerce in London, Paris, and Italy.

Augie Verciglio is eager to begin the study of mechanical engineering, in addition to business, at the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York. From the research opportunities available in the freshman year, the plethora of internships, the LEED certified buildings, and the new solar field (which supplies most of the campus energy needs), RIT has many programs and qualities that appeal to Augie. Beginning this year, Augie will spend his summers working at Orion Industries, the site of his internship, where he will work with engineers to build robots for manufacturing facilities.

Becca Wright will attend the College of Wooster in Ohio, a school that is nationally recognized (along with Princeton University) for an innovative curriculum, which emphasizes mentored research. Becca mentioned the three beautiful libraries, strong sense of community, and accessible professors as factors that influenced her decision. She is not sure about her major, but looks forward to taking classes in philosophy and comparative literature, and would like to study abroad. Becca has considered nursing as a career. If interested, Wooster has an arrangement with Case Western Reserve University in which students attend Wooster for three years and Case Western for four; students then graduate with a Doctorate in Nursing and are ready to become leaders in the field.

Congratulations to all 2015 Seniors:
We look forward to hearing about your future endeavours!

When Springfield Elementary Became a Waldorf School!

Thursday, June 2015

The Simpsons gave a well-crafted, comic shout out to Waldorf Education during their Season 26 finale for 2015—“Mathlete’s Feat”, which aired May 17, 2015

We are honored to have been featured in such a positive light on The Simpsons Season Finale and are anxiously awaiting further information about which writers, perhaps Waldorf parents or alumni themselves, were involved in the episode’s creation. As a thank you, and a responding shout out of sorts, Waldorf schools have been paying tribute to The Simpsons. A collective of handmade hats is being created to send to The Simpsons writers. The Waldorf School of Philadelphia is having students create beeswax figures of The Simpsons characters to share online and with The Simpsons execs. And the São Paulo, Brazil Waldorf school has done an amazing rendition of The Simpsons Theme Song, found here on YouTube, as a tribute to this mainstream recognition. Track the fun and folly on social media at #simpsonslovewaldorf.

WATCH THE EPISODE ON YOU TUBE. And here are the main details of the Waldorf-centric plot:

After a scathing math competition defeat, tech bigwigs take pity on Springfield Elementary and outfit the school with all the latest technology. But Principal Skinner’s ineptitude leads to a server farm crash and the school loses all tech, which the students had only used to watch Game of Thrones anyway.

This is when Lisa comes up with an idea that will save the school—“Learning while Doing.”  Springfield Elementary becomes a Waldorf School!

From there the students learn by doing in tongue-in-cheek fashion—calculating the cubic feet of styrofoam to add to the sloppy joe mix, pouring pints of beer in fractions, wearing required sun hats, and singing songs of acceptance, love and diversity. In the end, their new Waldorf Education helps them win the mathlete rematch by transforming an M into nine non-overlapping triangles.

The Association of Waldorf Schools of North America was pleased with the level of in-depth knowledge The Simpsons writers clearly possessed about pedagogy and stereotypes associated with Waldorf Education, which made this fun caricature both lighthearted and flattering.

The Simpsons Episode's Insights Into Waldorf Education:

Math - Mathematics education is very advanced in Waldorf schools. Math is revealed to students as a useful and real part of everyday life. Numbers, processes and then mathematical concepts are introduced through doing—counting and holding, paper folding, musical interval training, and calculations to create rope and pulley systems are just a few examples of how math is taught in Waldorf schools. We are not surprised that the Springfield Waldorf School could answer such a difficult final math equation to win the math competition. The challenge of drawing the nine non-overlapping triangles mimics the lessons in form drawings taught in our curriculum—another intersection of math, art, and doing experienced in Waldorf Education.

Sun Hats - Why of course! Waldorf students are prepared for all weather, at all times. Why?  Because, unlike many of their non-Waldorf peers, they still play outdoors for recess 3-4 times a day and also have classes outdooring such as science, physical education and gardening. Of course, hats for our adults are optional and they’re not required indoors. Nor is tie dye a requirement.

Technology - In the episode, Marge reads a pamphlet which says, “Waldorf Education: When you have Given up on the Modern World.” Considering the popularity of Waldorf Education among the children of Silicon Valley tech executives, this tongue-in-cheek parody is clearly not quite the case, but it had been a stereotype of the past. Waldorf Educators simply feel there are better ways, more hands on and complex ways to teach young children how to learn. Technology is introduced to secondary education children, which as Skinner notes in the episode is “Not our Problem.”

Textbooks - There are no textbooks in Waldorf Education, it’s true. But there are many, many books. They are just not the ones provided to the state by textbook companies. Instead our students are presented material by teachers from classics and mainstream books on relevant topics, where they then take notes and reflect on lessons while creating their own “Main Lesson” books. These books become both catalogs and resources for learning.

In the end, Springfield Elementay Waldorf School Mathletes go on to win the rematch competition, and who's to say if Springfield Elementary will remain a Waldorf School at the start of the new season. We'll just have to stay tuned to find out.  Meanwhile, remember: You can follow more of the fun responses in social media at #simpsonslovewaldorf!

Image from “Mathlete’s Feat,” the season 26 finale, May 17, 2015

12th Grade Play Introduces the Chronicles of Narnia

Tuesday, May 2015

The High School Drama Program and the 12th grade present:

The Lion, The Witch & the Wardrobe

Thursday−Saturday, May  21st−23rd
All evenings at 7:00 pm & Saturday matinee at 2:00 pm

CWS Auditorium

Enjoy this dramatization of C.S. Lewis’s iconic children's fantasy novel, The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe. Join the 12th grade cast as they tell the beloved adventure story of the four Pevensie children who travel to Narnia, a mystical land full of magic, mystery, and the talking lion, Aslan. The 12th grade play is traditionally the culminating event of the Waldorf drama curriculum; the acting, all stage craft (set-building, costumes and props fabrication) are handled by the seniors. Come support them and appreciate their final dramatic performance! 

Free Admission (though any donations are gratefully accepted and will be applied to the 12th grade trip).
Recommended for children in 1st grade and up.

Poster Artwork by 12th grade student: Augie Verciglio

May Fair Unveils Spring Celebration in Our Waldorf Community

Wednesday, May 2015

CWS May Fair 2015
Saturday, May 16th


We are eagerly readying for Saturday. Here are the great activities, vendors and entertainment that will be part of the day’s events.

Please invite your friends to come together with the children, teachers, parents and friends to enjoy the day of our May Fair.



Our Waldorf community brings you music & performing arts:

10:00am    The Levinson Family
                    CWS father and sons playing international
                    folk tunes on keyboard and strings.

11:00am    The Kelson Twins
                     Maddie and Juliet Kelson (high school juniors)
                     are an Americana duo who blend sibling harmonies
                     and poetic lyrics that have attracted local
                     & international fans.

12:00pm    Maypole Dance
                    Performed by the 4th grade, with musical
                    accompaniment by the 5th grade. Young children
                    may join with 4th grade partners in the
                    participation round.

1:00pm      Anna Fermin & Tony Richards
                   Anna is a well-known singer-songwriter who fronts
                    the alt-country band Trigger Gospel. Musician &
                    CWS parent Tony Richards accompanies on guitar.

2:00pm      Michelle Shafer
                    CWS parent Michelle Shafer is a singer-songwriter-
                    poet who will be performing an eclectic mix of
                    classical, Flamenco, pop/rock and traditional guitar.

3:00pm     Waldorf High School Students
                   Dramatic scenes, music & singing are presented
                   by the CWS high school students.



For young children in Early Childhood years:

Roll the Troll                                                                             
Bowling with the forest creatures. Watch the trolls fall; Get ‘em all!

Treasure Hunt      
Explore the hay pile to find special treats and treasures inside.

Plant A Seed   
You plant a seed in good soil... then take it home to watch it grow!

Roving Butterflies      
Children make their own floating/flying butterfly toy.

Bean Bag Toss
Enjoy helping the bees (bags) find the flowers (their targets).



Jumprope Making
Hand-crank the machine to turn yarn into your colorful jump-rope.

Flower Crowns     
Adorned with a festive crown, you embody the spirit of the Fair!

Cake Walk   
Walk to music but be the last one sitting to win a choice cake.

Face Painting / Hair Wraping   
Select your Waldorf style face art or choice of hair adornment.      

Henna Dyeing    
Get a traditional India henna skin tattoo that will last for days!

Take home your own organic designs on a colorful shirt!

Plunger Derby
Who is the fastest in this crazy race? Speed & skills required.

Color Maze   
Can you find your way out of the maze? Multiple challenges await.



Dragon Shoot    
Test your accuracy. You’ll need nerves of steel to slay the dragon!

Carpet Ball    
Who will rule this billiard game? Use strategy & cunning to win.



These artisans vendors were specifically selected for wares and services that are valued by the Waldorf community:

Baizaar     /     Lauren Bishop 
Hand-crafted jewelry and accessories from artists around the world, vintage hill tribe & sari bags, handmade journals & cards.

Ro Hart 
Products made with all natural fibers. Handmade items for children & teachers, classrooms & season tables.

SW1’s Exotic Reflections     /     Sheronna Williams
Hand-crafted jewelry, gemstones, unique sterling silver, artifacts.

Nomadic Ant     /     Suzanne Miranda  
Jewelry, children’s international souvenirs.

Claybration     /     Martha Plaza-Weber
Felted wool sweaters, birds, garlands, necktie fashions, skirts, totes, purses, needle felted denim.

Pacha Love     /     Lenin Morales 
Jewelry, sunglasses, t-shirts, purses.

Katherine-Anne Confections  /     Kelsey Schroeder 
Handmade chocolate truffles, caramels, marshmallows, and European style sipping chocolate.

doTERRA Essential Oils     /     Megan Hall 
Single oils and blends, instructional uses.

Unan Imports     /     Al Ntamere  
Handmade crafted jewelry, hats, organic body care items.

The Dribbly Pear   /      Marieke Van Der Maelen 
1:12 scale modern dollhouse miniature, science themed toys, Chicago-themed culinary jewelry.

Maureen Flannery 
Dolls, gnomes, felt items, fairie houses, imports.

Bootleg Batard    /     Melina Kelson  
Long-fermented, handmade and wood-fired breads. Jams featuring
local, sustainably and organically raised fruits. All natural granola.

Clay Ceramics    /     Jane Wohlreich 
Hand made clay pots, bowls, trays, platters & mugs.

Twinkles and Twigs    /     Sue Erickson 
Wool felted fairies and more.

Esther’s Place  
Spinning wheels, weaving looms, felting and knitting supplies, kits and classes and everything Fiber-Arts related.

Balance Through Motion     /     Liz Kantorski
Hand-made balance boards. Using balance boards strengthens balance, bodies & minds through motion!

Urban Yoga Chicago     /     Anna Gratzl  
Kundalini yoga & meditation classes. Vegetarian cooking classes.

Welcome Your Light     /     Laura Pryzby 
Health coaching , Reiki, angel healing and meditation.

Think Like a Fairy     /     Dawn Servitto 
Fairy doors, handmade by Waldorf 5th grade students.

Barefoot Books     /     Terri Arain
Multicultural children’s books that spark the imagination and inspire
creativity from birth to 12 years of age. Celebrate art and story!

Children’s Vending Table   /      CWS Students
8th grader, Ely is offering his paintings, drawings & trading cards.
Visit Drake’s new crystal rock shop: “We Know Rock, Worldwide”


We can’t wait to see you at the fair!!

Colleges Seek Out Our Waldorf Senior Class

Wednesday, April 2015

This year at Chicago Waldorf High School, 16 of our graduating seniors have applied to a college or university. The schools below accepted our graduating seniors as of 4/7/2015. Merit scholarship offers have been generous as colleges attempt to lure the most qualified students.

Worthy Of Note:

A number of colleges and universities are new additions to our list our institutions seeking our CWS graduates. These new schools are Mt. Holyoke College, Northwestern University, Rochester Institute of Technology, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, as well as universities in Canada and the United Kingdom. College familiarity with CWS continues to expand with each graduating class!

Congratulations to the 2015 seniors & their families!

Colleges that the Senior Class of 2015 have been accepted to:


Bates College, ME
Bath Spa University, United Kingdom
Beloit College, WI
Bishop’s University, Quebec
Butler University, IN
California College of the Arts, CA
Carleton College, MN
College of Wooster, OH
Columbia College Chicago
Cornell College, IA
Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia
DePaul University, IL
Drake University, IA
Earlham College, IN
Eckerd College, FL
Fashion Institute of Technology, NY
Flagler College, FL
Illinois Wesleyan University
Illinois Wesleyan University Nursing Program
Indiana University -- Bloomington
Iowa State University
Juniata College, PA
Knox College, IL
Lawrence University, WI
Leeds University, United Kingdom
Loyola University Chicago
Lynn University, FL


Marquette University, WI
Monmouth College, IL
Mt. Holyoke College, MA
Northwestern University, IL
Queen’s University, Ontario
Parson’s—The New School for Design, NY
Pratt Institute, NY
Ripon College, WI
Rochester Institute of Technology, NY
St. Francis Xavier University, Nova Scotia
St. John’s University, NY
St. Louis University, MO
St. Mary’s, MN
Temple University, PA
Tuskegee University, AL
University of British Columbia
University of Colorado -- Boulder
University of Dayton, OH
University of Illinois at Chicago
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
University of Iowa
University of Puget Sound, WA
University of Vermont Nursing Program
Whitman College, WA
Willamette University, OR
Worcester Polytechnic Institute, MA


The Music Program Presents The 2015 Spring Concert

Thursday, April 2015

You are invited by the CWS Music Faculty to attend an instrumental evening concert by students in 5th-12th grades.

The Spring Concert

Wednesday, April 15th

7:00pm • CWS Auditorium


Featuring the middle school bands and orchestras and high school African Drumming, Chamber Ensemble, Guitar I, Guitar Ensemble, Improv Ensemble and Jazz Band.

Appreciate the variety and depth of skills, experience and musical creativity our students have to share.

Doors open 6:45pm / begins at 7:00pm / ends at 8:45pm

We warmly invite the community to attend this exciting evening concert and experience the full scope of the Waldorf instrumental curriculum!

Photos, Top to Bottom: CWS Music Faculty introduce the Middle School & High School instrumental ensembles.
Each ensemble, orchestra and band performs in the 2014 Spring Concert.

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